fair


fair
fair adj
1 comely, lovely, *beautiful, pretty, bonny, handsome, beauteous, pulchritudinous, good-looking
Analogous words: delicate, dainty, exquisite (see CHOICE): charming, attractive, enchanting (see under ATTRACT): pure, *chaste
Antonyms: foul: ill-favored
2 Fair, just, equitable, impartial, unbiased, dispassionate, uncolored, objective are comparable when they are applied to judgments or to judges or to acts resulting from or involving a judgment and mean free from undue or improper influence.
Fair, the most general term, implies the disposition or the intention to regard other persons or things without reference to one's own interests, feelings, or prejudices, often even to the point of conceding every reasonable claim of the weaker side or of giving oneself or the stronger side no undue advantage
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a fair distribution of one's estate

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a fair decision by a judge

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fair play

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when we consider how helpless a partridge is ... it does seem fairer that the gunner should have but one chance at the bird— Jefferies

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I believe you will find them a fair solution of this complicated and difficult problem— Roosevelt

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Just implies no divergence from the standard or measure of what has been determined or is accepted as right, true, or lawful and dealings that are exactly in accordance with those de-terminations, no matter what one's personal inclinations or interests may be or what considerations in favor of the person or thing judged may be adduced
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a just judge

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some juster prince perhaps had . . . safe restored me to my native land— Pope

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how much easier it is to be generous than justJunius

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to divert interest from the poet to the poetry . . . would conduce to a juster estimation of actual poetry, good and bad— T. S. Eliot

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Equitable implies a freer and less rigid standard than just, often the one which guides a court of equity as distinguished from a court of law and which provides relief where rigid adherence to the law would make for unfairness
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he has an equitable claim to the property

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More often the word implies fair and equal treatment of all concerned
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a form of society which will provide for an equitable distribution of . . . riches— Krutch

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it depended wholly on their individual characters whether their terms of office were equitable or oppressive— Buchan

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Impartial implies absence of favor for or absence of prejudice against one person, party, or side more than the other
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an impartial tribunal

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impartial summing up of evidence

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the law provides for the examination by neutral, impartial psychiatric experts of all persons indicted for a capital offense— Current Biog.

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Unbiased expresses even more strongly the absence of all prejudice or prepossession and a disposition to be fair to all
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an unbiased history

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give an unbiased opinion

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presents an able, fair, and singularly unbiased picture of the Russian seeneMarquand

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Dispassionate implies freedom from the influence of passion or strong feeling, often also implying great temperateness or even coldness in judgment
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a dispassionate judgment of the young actor's abilities

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dispassionate men, precise in laboratories, with nothing to consider but the facts— Ciardi

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Uncolored (see also COLORLESS) implies freedom from influences (as personal feeling or a desire to embellish) that would affect the truth or accuracy of an account, a statement, or a judgment
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an uncolored story of a battle

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an uncolored record of one's experiences

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a statement of facts, uncolored by personal prejudice

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Objective implies a tendency to view events or phenomena as apart from oneself and therefore to be judged on purely factual bases and without reference to one's personal feelings, prejudices, opinions, or interests
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nor must we be content with a lazy skepticism, which regards objective truth as unattainable— Russell

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we shall be like ice when relating passions and adventures ... we shall be . . . objective and impersonal— Troy

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Analogous words: disinterested, detached (see INDIFFERENT): reasonable, *rational
Antonyms: unfair
Contrasted words: partial, prepossessed, biased, prejudiced (see corresponding nouns at PREDILECTION)
2 average, *medium, middling, mediocre, second-rate, moderate, indifferent
Analogous words: ordinary, *common
Contrasted words: *good, right: *bad, poor, wrong
fair n exposition, *exhibition, show, exhibit

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fair — adj 1: characterized by honesty and justice: free from self interest, deception, injustice, or favoritism a fair and impartial tribunal 2: reasonable as a basis for exchange a fair wage a fair valuation 3: consistent with merit or importance …   Law dictionary

  • Fair — (f[^a]r), a. [Compar. {Fairer}; superl. {Fairest}.] [OE. fair, fayer, fager, AS. f[ae]ger; akin to OS. & OHG. fagar, Icel. fagr, Sw. fager, Dan. faver, Goth. fagrs fit, also to E. fay, G. f[ u]gen, to fit. fegen to sweep, cleanse, and prob. also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fair — fair1 [fer] adj. [ME < OE fæger, akin to FAIN, Goth fagrs, apt, fit < IE base * pek , to be content, make (something) pretty > Lith púošiu, to ornament] 1. attractive; beautiful; lovely 2. unblemished; clean [a fair name] 3. [< notion …   English World dictionary

  • fair — Ⅰ. fair [1] ► ADJECTIVE 1) just or appropriate in the circumstances. 2) treating people equally. 3) considerable in size or amount. 4) moderately good. 5) (of hair or complexion) light; blonde. 6) (of weather) f …   English terms dictionary

  • fair do's — /dooz/ (pl of ↑do; informal) An expression appealing for, or agreeing to, fair play, strict honesty, etc • • • Main Entry: ↑fair * * * fair do’s british spoken phrase used for drawing attention to something good about someone although you are… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Fair — steht für: einen Ausdruck im Sinne von „gerecht“ in den Bereichen Sport, Recht und Informatik: siehe Fairness als Abkürzung FAIR „Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research“, siehe GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung Fairness Accuracy in… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Fair — Fair, n. [OE. feire, OF. feire, F. foire, fr. L. fariae, pl., days of rest, holidays, festivals, akin to festus festal. See {Feast}.] 1. A gathering of buyers and sellers, assembled at a particular place with their merchandise at a stated or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fair Em — Fair Em, the Miller s Daughter of Manchester, is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy written c. 1590. It was bound together with Mucedorus and The Merry Devil of Edmonton in a volume labelled Shakespeare. Vol. I in the library of Charles II… …   Wikipedia

  • fair — fair, fairly adverbs. Fair is used in its ordinary meaning ‘in a fair manner’ in several fixed expressions, e.g. to bid fair, to play fair, fair between the eyes. In dialect use and in some non British varieties it is used to mean ‘completely,… …   Modern English usage

  • fair — [adj1] impartial, unprejudiced aboveboard, benevolent, blameless, candid, civil, clean, courteous, decent, disinterested, dispassionate, equal, equitable, even handed, frank, generous, good, honest, honorable, impartial, just, lawful, legitimate …   New thesaurus


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